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Get started with native plants

Native plants make great additions to your garden! Drought resistant, heat tolerant, and perfect for the summer, learn more about what native plants could add a touch of color to your garden!

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Students get free seeds!

K-12 youth across Hawaiʻi are invited to participate in Seed and Serve Hawaiʻi, a youth at-home gardening campaign to grow the next generation of sustainability leaders across our islands. Sign up to receive a seed packet to begin growing their own at-home garden

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Report your action!

Did you participate in this month's action? Be sure to take a picture of your compost pile or your responsible fertilizer use and submit it for your thank you discount! Mahalo for you support!

 How gardens help the Bay

Plants vs. Runoff

Plants are effective in removing pollutants from storm water through a process called bio‐filtration. In this process, the soil traps and plant roots breakdown pollutants into food or fertilizer. Some of the pollutants that can be trapped or removed by the soil and plants include: suspended solids (dirt), nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorous), heavy metals (lead, copper, and zinc), micro‐organisms (bacteria), and surfactants (detergents, oils, and grease)


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In contrast, stormwater runoff  occurs when impervious surfaces (like rooftops and paving) prevent rainwater from soaking into the ground at or near where it falls. Instead, rain falls on the roof, spills into the gutter, down the downspout, across the impermeable driveway and sidewalk into the street, then the stormdrains, and ultimately into creeks, rivers and the ocean, all the while unavailable for local irrigation, and without ever nurturing the land.

                                          

In Hawaii, increasing urbanization leads to more and more impervious surfaces and higher concentrations of pollutants making their way into our ocean ecosystems. In the Maunalua Bay region, there are over 5,000 storm drains and 5 shopping centers that all feed into Maunalua Bay. 

By doing your part to plant gardens on your property, you help mitigate the impacts of so much impervious ground cover in the Maunalua Bay region. Here are some quick gardening tips:

 

Look for a sunny spot on your property that might be bare ground or filled with invasive plants

Planting in a low spot or depression in your yard where water collects can be a good start towards creating a rain garden

Plant native species 

Get free seeds for your keiki from the Seed and Serve Hawaii project (more on that below!) 

 Seed and Serve Hawaii

Let’s get growing! Youth across Hawaiʻi are invited to participate in Seed and Serve Hawaiʻi, a youth at-home gardening campaign to grow the next generation of sustainability leaders across our islands. K-12 students, families, schools, and youth-serving organizations can register to receive a seed packet to begin growing their own at-home garden (1 packet per student). Gardening and growing food is a clear path forward to growing sustainable, peaceful and healthier communities and we’re excited to see your plants!

Register now through June 7 HERE

Eligibility: Hawai'i students in grades K-12

How Seed and Serve Hawaiʻi Works:

Register below by Sunday, June 7, 2020

We will mail your seed packet to the address provided

Plant your seeds in your own at-home (indoor or outdoor garden)

Seed options will include Mānoa lettuce, Hawaiian chili pepper, eggplant, and grape tomato from the UH Seed Lab. Students will receive 1 of their top 3 choices.

Share your gardening photos on social media and tag @bzpwahiawa @ceedsofpeace @malamamaunalua @bzphawaii #seedandserve

Please fill out one form per youth at www.bit.ly/seedandserve

We’d love to share any gardening photos on our social medias so tag us @bzpwahiawa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rain gardens are particularly good at

biofiltration but all plants can help

reduce pollutants in stormwater

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Get your keiki gardening!

‘öhi‘a is a very attractive tree that has been used in the landscape industry for many years. It grows at all elevations, prefers

a lot of sun, and needs to be watered every 2-3 days. 

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ʻAʻaliʻi is a dense shrub/small tree that also grows well where most plants do not, preferring little water and dry soil. It’s known for its resiliency, as quoted in an ancient warrior boast: “He ʻaʻaliʻi au; ʻaʻohe makani e hina ai” meaning “I am an ʻaʻaliʻi shrub; no wind can push me over.”

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ʻIlima papa, more properly called ʻilima kū kahakai makes excellent groundcover for open, sunny and/or windy coastal areas. Just be careful not to over water!

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Additional Resources

Native Plant Ideas for You!